Sunday, August 30, 2009

Trot mother, trot father, how can the foal amble?

Children follow the example set by parents. People whose kids behave badly often ask: where did we go wrong?

It is natural for the young to kick over the traces as they are inexperienced and full of youthful energy; however, if parents preach virtue but do not practise it their offspring quickly cotton on and try to get away with bad behaviour.

Children need a lead to follow; it is inevitable they will make some mistakes but if they have a good set of values in the first place they will know they have fallen short of the ideal. To err is human, to forgive is divine.

Humor sweetens life. Limericks to make you laugh.
How to write a Limerick Edward Lear improved Part 1

How to write Limericks Edward Lear improved Part 2

Sunday, August 23, 2009

He who trusts all things to chance makes a lottery of his life

A happy-go-lucky fellow who worries not what the future may hold, wandering free as a gypsy, and no doubt whistling a merry tune sounds like he is living the ideal life style.

Compare this with the typical modern life of constant care and worrying - will the bills be paid on time? is my job secure? does the boss dislike me? does my bum look big in this? is my spouse attracted to someone else?

The chancer's luck usually runs out eventually. The bankruptcy courts are full of the kind of person who has overweening optimism and always believes that something will turn up.

The ordinary, prudent person who is nagged by worries and doubts will usually take sufficient care to avoid the worst of life's foreseeable calamities. Forewarned is forearmed.


YouTube videos to cheer you up:
How to write a Limerick Edward Lear improved Part 1

How to write Limericks Edward Lear improved Part 2

Sunday, August 16, 2009

Destiny leads the willing but drags the unwilling

'There's a divinity that shapes our ends, Rough-hew them how we will' wrote Shakespeare in Hamlet.

There are major trends in our lives that surge on like mighty rivers. We can go with the flow or try to paddle across or up stream. When energy flags the current pulls us back down the river.

The thinking behind this idea seems to be that much of the course of our lives is fixed, probably as a result of our DNA plus when and where we were born. "It is written in the stars" is a common expression reflecting a belief in destiny. A knowledge of the cycles of the Heavenly bodies can enable predictions of when and where they will appear. Likewise, many of the coming events in our lives "cast their shadows" before them and can be anticipated.

Wise people can learn to read the signs, and forecast the likely outcomes and adjust their behaviour accordingly. But if you try to deny your nature and circumstances, fate is likely to outwit you.

If, until recently, you thought that it was your destiny to be rich, and now find yourself one of the "credit-crunch poor" perhaps you have been dragged into your true destiny and need to carefully rethink your life strategy and goals.


Watch these videos on YouTube if you need cheering up.

How to write a Limerick Edward Lear improved Part 1

How to write Limericks Edward Lear improved Part 2

Sunday, August 09, 2009

Despair doubles our force

It could be as simple as running for a bus - that sinking feeling of missing it, and the consequences thereof, gives a boost to effort.

If we did not feel the misery of loss we would not exert ourselves in difficult situations. It is the intense dislike of losing that propels many successful persons to achievement, rather than the pleasure of winning. Unpleasant feelings are there to act as a spur, to make us try our utmost.

Psychologists talk abut the pleasure/pain principle, and folklore knows the relevance of the carrot and the stick. People will not apply themselves fully out of a simple intellectual recognition of the correctness of some act - they need the stimulus of feeling.

A good antidote to despair is laughter, try these:
How to write a Limerick Edward Lear improved Part 1

How to write Limericks Edward Lear improved Part 2

Sunday, August 02, 2009

Diet cures more than the lancet

Better no illness than a cure for illness. We all admire and respect the clever scientist who dedicates a lifetime to finding a cure for a dreadful disease. We do not begrudge the pharmaceutical company its just profits for funding and distributing the resulting medication. But what if the condition was easily preventable?

Being ill is not the natural state of affairs for most people. Wise minds have for centuries been pointing out that good diet and a healthy life style will enable you to lead a long, happy and healthy existence.

There is no need to be faddy or extreme as you can still greatly enjoy food, even a little of what's bad for you, if you put in some effort to use your common-sense and build a wiser pattern into your diet. There is no shortage of good advice - you probably know the basics already - just have the determination to apply it.

It is a tough world out there, and getting tougher, so make sure you are fit and ready to cope with it.


Laughter is the best medicine. Try these funny videos:

How to write a Limerick Edward Lear improved Part 1

How to write Limericks Edward Lear improved Part 2

About Me


Author of "Stirring Western Poems" "How to Write Lyrical Limericks & Poems that Pay" "700 Limericks & How to Write Them"
"Clean Limericks For All Occasions"